Data encryption for the cloud.

Lately I’ve been using SkyDrive and DropBox to keep backups of my files. Before trusting them with my data I reviewed their security policies and was assured that they use strong encryption and security measures in place to protect the data. I thought that was sufficient enough to begin using them as my backup.

Recently it’s dawned on me there’s still that risk of some hacker finding some way to break in even the most secure of servers and helping himself to the treasure trove of data stored within. To counter that risk I decided to see if there’s a way to make my data even more secure in the cloud.

BoxCryptor is one solution I found and it works really well. It seamlessly integrates with DropBox, SkyDrive, Google Drive or your preferred cloud-based file storage service.

When installed, BoxCryptor creates its own folder in your storage service’s local folder  and then sets up a drive letter of your choosing to map to that folder. Anything you copy to the Boxcryptor folder will be encrypted on the fly and synchronized to the cloud-based file storage service of your choice.

I use BoxCryptor on both SkyDrive and DropBox and can easily switch it from one account to the other. I like the extra layer of data security it provides.

I’ve given thought to protecting my data even further by using TrueCrypt to create encrypted file containers for my data and uploading them through BoxCryptor. While that adds even more security, the minor downside to this is typing in my password to open these file containers but it just might work to keep my data even more secure in the cloud.

I know, it’s starting to sound like I’m up to something no good by hiding my data like this. The only thing I’m really up to is giving those hackers such nasty headaches they’ll need aspirin-flavored milkshakes.

UPDATE: Just after posting this I did decide to use TrueCrypt to create an encrypted file container for my files. The file container is 46MB in size and is taking a long time to upload to the cloud. Alas, that could be another downside to this whole thing.

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