Wolves on Mars.

Finally, after decades of disruption, delay and legal wrangling, the United States became the first country to establish a military base on another planet.

This was not an easy task to accomplish. The government had to find ways to raise the several quadrillion dollars needed to send the personnel and materials to construct the base on Mars. To do this, taxes were raised and essential government services slashed, but not without protests from around the country. Frequently these protests turned violent but ultimately they failed to sway the ambitions of the President, who himself faced enormous resistance from Congress. Finally, the President resorted to signing an executive order to establish the military base on Mars.

And so began a series of extremely lengthy, expensive and dangerous missions to Mars to begin construction of the base. During this time there were disastrous setbacks as the unforgiving Martian weather wreaked havoc on man and machine. Morale plummeted and the casualties kept climbing but the President persisted in achieving his vision. Slowly and painfully, construction of the base inched its way to completion. Finally, the United States had established a military presence on Mars.

The new base was deeply unpopular with both politicians and the public. Construction severely drained the economy towards a crippling recession. Operating the base would prove just as costly, leading many to wonder exactly what the President was thinking.

Perhaps no one summarized the overall frustration with the Martian military base better than the Senate majority leader whose efforts to defeat its plans proved to be a monumental failure. He had seen the President leaving a press conference in which he answered questions about the controversial base. Enraged, he channeled his anger into three words heard throughout the hallway.

“What now, genius?”

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